Rear Admiral Joseph James Clark, United States Navy, Native American

thOne of Oklahoma’s distinguished, high ranking personnel in the forces of the United States in World War II, Rear Admiral Joseph James Clark, is a native Oklahoman of Cherokee descent. His outstanding service record compiled by the Navy Department is as follows:

Rear Admiral Clark was born in Pryor, Oklahoma, November 12, 1893, and prior to his appointment to the Naval Academy, he attended Willie Halsell College, Vinita, Oklahoma, and Oklahoma Agriculture and Mechanical College, Stillwater, Oklahoma. While at the Naval Academy he played lacrosse and soccer. He graduated with the Class of 1918 in June 1917, and during the World War served in the U.S.S. North Carolina which was engaged in convoying troops across the Atlantic. From 1919 to 1922 he served in destroyers in the Atlantic, in European waters and in the Mediterranean, and during the latter part of that duty served with the American Relief Administration in the Near East.

In 1922-1923 he had duty at the Naval Academy as instructor in the Department of Seamanship and Navigation, and qualified as a naval aviator at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida, on March 16, 1925. Later that year he joined the Aircraft Squadrons of the Battle Fleet and assisted Commander John Rodgers in preparing navigational data for the first West Coast-Hawaii flight in 1925, and received a letter of commendation for this service.

In 1926 he joined the U.S.S. Mississippi and served as her senior aviation officer and during the following year was aide on the staff of Commander, Battleship Division Three, and served as Division Aviation Officer.

From 1928 to 1931 Rear Admiral Clark was executive officer, Naval Air Station, Anacostia, D.C., and during the next two years was commanding officer of Fighter Squadron Two attached to the U.S.S. Lexington. He was the aeronautical member of the Board of Inspection and Survey, Navy Department, from 1933 to 1936 and during the next tour of sea duty July, 1936 to June, 1937, served as the Lexington‘s representative at Fleet Air Detachment. U.S. Naval Air Station, San Diego, California, and later as Air Officer of the Lexington. He was executive officer of the Fleet Air Base, Pearl Harbor, from July, 1937, to May, 1939. During the months of June and July he had additional duty with Patrol Wing Two, and, until the end of the year, was executive officer of the Naval Air Station at Pearl Harbor, afterwards serving as inspector of naval aircraft at the Curtis Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, New York.

He was executive officer of the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, from December 1940, until May 1941, when he reported for duty as executive officer of the old U.S.S. Yorktown, and in that carrier participated in the raid on the Marshall and Gilbert Islands. After detachment from the Yorktown he had duty in the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, Washington, D.C., from February 28 until June 20, 1942. He fitted out an auxiliary aircraft carrier, the U.S.S. Suwanee, and commanded her from her Commissioning.

For his service in this command during the assault on and occupation of French Morocco, he received the following Letter of Commendation by Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, U.S.N., Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet:

“The Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet, notes with pleasure and gratification the report of your performance of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Suwanee during the assault on and occupation of French Morocco from November 11, 1942. The Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet, commends you for the high efficiency, outstanding performance and skillful handling of the U.S.S. Suwanee and attached aircraft which contributed so notably to the unqualified success attained by the Air Group during this operation. Your meritorious performance of duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Naval Service.”

On February 15, 1943, he reported to the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia in connection with fitting out the U.S.S. Yorktown and commanded her from commissioning until February 10, 1944. For his service in this command during the operations against Marcus, Wake, Mille, Jaluit, Makin, Kwajalein and Wotje, he has been awarded a Letter of Commendation by Vice Admiral John H. Towers, U.S.N., Commander, Air Force, Pacific Fleet, and a Silver Star Medal, with the following citations:

Letter of Commendation:

“For extraordinary performance and distinguished service in the line of his profession as commanding officer, U.S.S. Yorktown during the operations against Marcus Island on 31 August 1943 and against Wake Island on 5-6 October, 1943. On the first mentioned date, the air group of the Yorktown was launched at night and after a successful rendezvous was sent to Marcus Island and delivered the first attack before dawn. In this attack, the enemy was taken completely by surprise and all aircraft were destroyed on the ground. The subsequent attacks delivered by his air group contributed to the destruction of approximately eighty per cent of the installations on the island. On 5 October, 1943, his air group repeated a successful and effective attack on Wake Island before dawn. During this attack, eight enemy airplanes were destroyed in aerial combat and five were strafed on the ground. Eight additional airplanes were destroyed in the air by his air group in the following attack and eleven on the runways. Repeated bombing and strafing attacks were effectively delivered against all assigned objectives on that date. On 6 October, additional airplanes were strafed on the runways during a pre-dawn attack and severe damage wrought by dive bombing and strafing attacks on anti-aircraft and shore battery emplacements, fuel dumps, barracks, shops and warehouses. A total of 89 tons of bombs were dropped by his air group on assigned objectives. His outstanding leadership, his exceptional ability to organize and his courageous conduct throughout these engagements contributed immeasurably to the destruction of the enemy forces on these islands. His performance of duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.”

Silver Star Medal

“For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Yorktown, during operations against enemy-held islands in the Central Pacific Area, from August 31 to December 5, 1943. Skillfully handling his ship during these widespread and extended operations, Rear Admiral (then Captain) Clark enabled aircraft based on his carrier to launch damaging attacks on enemy aircraft, shipping and shore installations on Marcus, Wake, Jaluit, Kwajalein and Wotje Islands. During the day and night of December 4, when the Yorktown was under severe enemy attack, almost continuously for one five-hour period at night, he maneuvered his vessel so expertly that all attacks were repelled without damage. By his devotion to duty throughout, he contributed materially to the success of our forces and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.”

The U.S.S. Yorktown was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for her heroism in action in the Pacific from August 31, 1943, to August 15, 1945. As her commanding officer during the first part of this period, Rear Admiral Clark received a facsimile of, and the ribbon for, this citation. The citation follows:

Presidential Unit Citation – USS Yorktown

“For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces in the air, at sea and on shore in the Pacific War Area from August 31, 1943, to August 15, 1945. Spearheading our concentrated carrier-warfare in forward areas, the U.S.S. Yorktown and her air groups struck crushing blows toward annihilating the enemy’s fighting strength; they provided air cover for our amphibious forces; they fiercely countered the enemy’s savage aerial attacks and destroyed his planes; and they inflicted terrific losses on the Japanese in Fleet and merchant marine units sunk or damaged. Daring and dependable in combat, the Yorktown with her gallant officers and men rendered loyal service in achieving the ultimate defeat of the Japanese Empire.”

On January 31, 1944, he was appointed Rear Admiral to rank from April 23, 1943. From February 1944 through June 1945 Rear Admiral Clark served as a Task Group Commander operating alternately with the First and Second Fast Carrier Task Groups of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, with the U.S.S. Hornet as his flagship. During this period he also was Commander of Carrier Division 13 (later redesignated Carrier Division 5). For his services during this period, Rear Admiral Clark was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Distinguished Service Medal, the Navy Cross, and the Legion of Merit. He also received a facsimile of and the ribbon for, the Presidential Unit Citation to the U.S.S. Hornet. The citations follow:

Distinguished Service Medal:

 ”For exceptionally meritorious service to the Government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility as Commander of a Task Group of Carriers and Screening Vessels in operations against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific Area from April through June 1944. Participating in our amphibious invasion of Hollandia on April 21 to 24, Rear Admiral Clark’s well-coordinated and highly efficient units rendered invaluable assistance to our landing forces in establishing a beachhead and securing their positions and later, at the Japanese stronghold of Truk, helped to neutralize shore installations and planes both on the ground and in the air. By his keen foresight and resourcefulness, Rear Admiral Clark contributed in large measure to the overwhelming victories achieved by our forces against Japanese carrier-based aircraft, task units and convoys during the battle of the Marianas and attacks on the Bonin Islands. His indomitable fighting spirit and heroic leadership throughout this vital period were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.”

Navy Cross:

“For distinguishing himself by extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Commander of a Task Group in the vicinity of the Bonin Islands on 4 August, 1944. Upon receipt of information that an enemy convoy had been sighted proceeding in a northerly course enroute from the Bonins to the Empire, he immediately requested and received permission to organize an interception. He forthwith proceeded at high speed to lead his forces into Japanese home waters and intercepted the convoy, sinking five cargo vessels, four destroyer escorts and one large new type destroyer, while aircraft launched on his order searched within two hundred miles of the main islands of Japan shooting down two four engined search planes and one twin engined bomber as well as strafing and heavily damaging a destroyer and sinking three sampan type patrol vessels, and later in the day a light cruiser and an additional destroyer. By his professional skill, high personal courage, and superlative leadership, he inspired the units under his command to exceptional performance of duty in close proximity to strongly held home bases of the enemy. His conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Naval Service.”

Legion of Merit:

“For exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service as Commander of a Task Group of the Fast Carrier Task Forces during the period from 24 March to 28 March 1945. On 24 March, he aggressively attacked a Japanese convoy of eight ships near the Ryuku Islands. By swift decisive action he directed planes of the Task group so that they were able to sink the entire convoy. On 28 March a sweep of Southern Ryuku was initiated by the Task Group Commander and resulted in the destruction of one Japanese destroyer and a destroyer escort, in addition to numerous Japanese aircraft. His quick thinking, careful planning and fighting spirit were responsible for a maximum of damage done to the enemy. His courage and devotion to duty were at all times inspiring and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.”

Gold Star in lieu of Second Distinguished Service Medal

“For exceptionally meritorious service to the Government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility as Commander Task Group Fifty-Eight Point One during action against enemy Japanese forces in the Tokyo Area and the Ryukyus, and in supporting operations at Okinawa, from February 10 to May 29, 1945. Maintaining his Task Group in a high state of combat readiness, Rear Admiral Clark skillfully deployed the forces at his disposal for maximum effectiveness against the enemy. Directing operations with brilliant and forceful leadership, he was responsible for the swift interception of Japanese air groups flying in to attack our surface units and by his prompt and accurate decisions, effected extensive and costly destruction in enemy planes thereby minimizing the danger to our ships and personnel. As a result of his bold and aggressive tactics against hostile surface units on March 24 and 28, the planes of Task Group Fifty-Eight Point One launched a fierce aerial attack against a convoy of eight enemy ships near the Ryukyu Islands to sink the entire convoy during the first engagement and a hostile destroyer and destroyer escort in the second. Courageous and determined in combat, Rear Admiral Clark served as an inspiration to the officers and men of his command and his successful fulfillment of a vital mission contributed essentially to the ultimate defeat of the Japanese Empire.”

Presidential Unit Citation – USS Hornet

“For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces in the air, ashore and afloat in the Pacific War Area from March 29, 1944, to June 10, 1945. Operating continuously in the most forward areas, the USS Hornet and her air groups struck crushing blows toward annihilating Japanese fighting power; they provided air cover for our amphibious forces; they fiercely countered the enemy’s aerial attacks and destroyed his planes; and they inflicted terrific losses on the Japanese in Fleet and merchant marine units sunk or damaged. Daring and dependable in combat, the Hornet with her gallant officers and men rendered loyal service in achieving the ultimate defeat of the Japanese Empire.”

Returning to the United States in June 1945, Rear Admiral Clark resumed duty as Chief, Naval Air Intermediate Training Command, with headquarters at Corpus Christi, Texas, on June 27, 1945, and served in this capacity until September 1946. On September 7, 1946, he assumed duty as Assistant Chief of Naval Operations (Air), Navy Department, Washington, D.C.

In addition to the Navy Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal with Gold Star, the Legion of Merit, the Silver Star Medal, the Commendation Ribbon, and the Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon with two stars, Rear Admiral Clark has the Victory Medal, Escort Clasp (USS North Carolina), and is entitled to the American Defense Service Medal with Bronze “A” (for service in the old USS Yorktown which operated in actual or potential belligerent contact with the Axis Forces in the Atlantic Ocean prior to December 7, 1941); the European-African-Middle Eastern Area Campaign Medal with one bronze star; the Asiatic-Pacific Area Campaign Medal with twelve bronze stars; the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with one bronze star; and the World War II Victory Medal.

After retirement, Admiral Clark was a business executive in New York. His last position was Chairman of the Board of Hegeman Harris, Inc., a New York investment firm. Clark was an honorary chief by both the Sioux and Cherokee nations. He died 13 July 1971 at the Naval Hospital, St. Albans, New York, and is buried in Arlington National Cemeteryat Section 3, Site 2525-B.

Source: “Notes and Documents: Rear Admiral Joseph James Clark, United States Navy, Native Oklahoman.” Chronicles of Oklahoma 25 (1947): 154-158

George Read – Signer of the United States Constitution – Delaware

ReadGeorgeGeorge Read was a native of the province of Maryland, where he was born on September 18, 1733 to John and Mary (Howell) Read. His grandfather was an Irishman, who resided in the city of Dublin, and was possessed of a considerable fortune. His son, John Read, the father of the subject of the present article, having emigrated to America, took up his residence in Cecil County, where he pursued the occupation of a planter. Not long after the birth of his eldest son, he removed with his family into the province of Delaware, and settled in the county of Newcastle. Mr. Read designing his son for one of the learned professions placed him in a seminary at Chester, in the province of Pennsylvania. Having there acquired the rudiments of the learned languages, he was transferred to the care of that learned and accomplished scholar, the Rev. Dr. Allison, a gentleman eminently qualified to superintend the education of young men. With this gentleman young Mr. Read continued his studies until his seventeenth year, when he entered the office of John Moland, Esq. a distinguished lawyer in the city of Philadelphia, for the purpose of acquiring a knowledge of the legal profession. The intense applications, and the sober habits of Mr. Read, were at this time highly honorable to him. While yet a student, he gave promise of future eminence in his profession. Mr. Moland reposed so great confidence in his abilities, that even before he had finished his preparatory studies, he entrusted to him a considerable share of his attorney business.

In 1753, at the early age of nineteen years, Mr. Read was admitted to the bar. On this event he performed an act of singular generosity in favor of the other children of the family. As the eldest son, he was entitled, by the existing laws, to two shares of his father’s estate, but he relinquished all his rights in favor of his brothers, assigning as a reason for this act, his belief that he had received his proper portion in the education which had been given him.

In the following year, he commenced the practice of law, in the town of Newcastle, and although surrounded by gentlemen of high attainments in the profession, he soon acquired the confidence of the public, and obtained a respectable share of business. In 1763, he was appointed to succeed John Ross, as attorney general of the three lower counties on the Delaware. This office, Mr. Read held until the year 1775, when, on being elected to congress, he resigned it.

During the same year, Mr. Read was connected by marriage with a daughter of the Rev. John Ross, a clergyman, who had long presided over an Episcopal church, in the town of Newcastle. The character of Mrs. Gertrude Ross Read was in every respect excellent. She possessed a vigorous understanding. In her person she was beautiful, and to elegant manners was added a deep and consistent piety. She was also imbued with the spirit of a pure patriotism. During the revolutionary war, she was often called to suffer many privations, and was frequently exposed with her infant family to imminent danger, by reason of the predatory incursions of the British. Yet, in the darkest hour, and amidst the most appalling danger, her fortitude was unshaken, and her courage undaunted.

In the year 1765, Mr. Read was elected a representative from Newcastle County to the general assembly of Delaware, a post which he occupied for twelve years. In this station, and indeed through his whole political course, he appears to have been actuated neither by motives of self-interest nor fear. By an adherence to the royal cause, he had reason to anticipate office, honor, and wealth. But his patriotism and integrity were of too pure a character to be influenced by worldly preferment, or pecuniary reward. The question with him was, not what a worldly policy might dictate, but what reason and justice and religion would approve.

On the first of August, 1774, Mr. Read was chosen a member of the continental congress, in connection with Caesar Rodney, and Thomas McKean. To this station he was annually re-elected, during the whole revolutionary war, and was indeed present in the national assembly, except for a few short intervals, during the whole of that period.

It has already been noticed, that when the great question of independence came before congress, Mr. Read was opposed to the measure, and ultimately gave his vote against it. This he did from a sense of duty: not that he was unfriendly to the liberties of his country, or was actuated by motives of selfishness or cowardice. But he deemed the agitation of the question, at the time, premature and inexpedient. In these sentiments, Mr. Read was not alone. Many gentlemen in the colonies, characterized for great wisdom, and a decided patriotism, deemed the measure impolitic, and would have voted, had they been in congress, as he did. The idle bodings of these, fortunately, were never realized. They proved to be false prophets, but they were as genuine patriots as others. Nor were they, like some in similar circumstances, dissatisfied with results, differing from those which they had predicted. On the contrary, they rejoiced to find their anticipations were groundless. When, at length, the measure had received the sanction of the great national council, and the time arrived for signing the instrument, Mr. Read affixed his signature to it, with all the cordiality of those who had voted in favor of the declaration itself.

In the following September, Mr. Read was elected president of the convention which formed the first constitution of the state of Delaware. On the completion of this, he was offered the executive chair, but chose at that time to de-cline the honor. In 1777, the governor, Mr. McKinley, was captured by a detachment of British troops, when Mr. McKean was called to take his place in this responsible office, the duties of which he continued to discharge, until the release of the former gentleman.

In 1779, ill health required him to retire for a season from public employment. In 1782, however, he accepted the appointment of judge of the court of appeals in admiralty cases, an office in which he continued till the abolition of the court.

In 1787, he represented the state of Delaware in the convention which framed the Constitution Of The United States, under which he was immediately elected a member of the Senate. The duties of this exalted station he discharged till 1793, when he accepted of a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of the state of Delaware, as chief justice. In this station he continued till the autumn of 1798, his death at New Castle 5 years later, just 3 days after he celebrated his 65th birthday, when he was suddenly summoned to another world. His grave is there in the Immanuel Episcopal Churchyard.

In all the offices with which Mr. Read was entrusted by his fellow citizens, he appeared with distinguished ability; but it was as a judge that he stood pre-eminent. For this station he was peculiarly fitted, not only by his unusual legal attainments, but by his singular patience in hearing all that council might deem important to bring forward, and by a cool and dispassionate deliberation of every circumstance which could bear upon the point in question. To this day his decisions are much respected in Delaware, and are often recurred to, as precedents of no doubtful authority.

In private life, the character of Mr. Read was not less estimable and respectable. He was consistent in all the relations of life, strict in the observance of his moral duties, and characterized by an expanded benevolence towards all around him.

James Nicholas “Nick” Rowe

20727_126565512531Who was Nick Rowe? Unless you are in a special forces group, a military history connoisseur, or a conspiracy theorist you probably would not have heard of him. . . . Oh wait . . . there are the materials he wrote Five Years to Freedom about his experience as a prisoner of war during Vietnam . . . and then there’s the SERE Manual . . . What is SERE? Oh, well, you see SERE is the training Colonel Rowe developed at the request of the US Army and used by all the services so there does not have to be any “on the job training” if someone is captured by the enemy. You see SERE stands for Survival Evade Resist Escape. It is based on then Lt Rowe’s 62 month experience as a prisoner of war and his escape.

Lets go back and start at the beginning. James Nicholas “Nick” Rowe was born in McAllen, TX on 08 February 1938. Graduated from high school and was admitted to United States Military Academy at West Point (West Point), New York. He graduated in 1960, was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the US Army. In 1963, 1st Lt. Rowe was sent to the Republic of Vietnam. He was assigned as an Executive Officer of Detachment A-23, 5th Special Forces Group. It was a 12-man “A-Team”. A-23 was located at Tan Phu in the An Xuyen Province. They advised a Civilian Irregular Defense Group encamped in the Mekong Delta region.

29 October 1963 Lt. Rowe, Captain Humberto R. “Rocky” Versace and Sergeant Daniel Pitzer, were captured by the Viet Cong (VC) during a fight and were imprisoned in the U Minh Forest in Southern Vietnam. For 62 months he battled dysentery, beriberi, various fungal diseases along with arduous psychological and physical torture. He lived in a bamboo cage, 3 x 4 x 6 feet in size. One of the most important factors was this . . . Nick Rowe was a SURVIVOR (emphasis added). Immediately he began looking for ways to resist his tormentors, and make escape plans.

Being an intelligence officer he knew it was vital to convince the VC he was unimportant. He was able to convince his captors he was a “draftee” engineer who was responsible for building school and community facilities. He assured them he knew very little about the military. After a test, the VC were convinced he was as he claimed. That only lasted until a “peace-seeking” group from the United States came to “insure the American POWs were safe and being treated humanely.” This group had a list of prisoners that included the names, but also the job duties while in Nam. When his captors saw this they were livid. Lt Rowe was brutally beaten, stripped and staked naked in the swamp. For two days he was blanketed by mosquitoes, despite their best efforts Rowe would not brake.

Scheduled for execution in late December 1968, Rowe successfully escaped in his “black pajamas” when a group of helicopters came into the area. At first the door gunner thought he was a VC since they wore “black pajamas”. Rowe convinced them who he was and they flew him to safety. He learned that he had been promoted to Major while he had been in captivity! For additional information read Five Years to Freedom.

For more information on Colonel James N. “Nick” Rowe there are several articles in Wikipedia, Military.com, History.com and several books written that are written about him or include him as subject matter. He was true gentle man, regardless what he endured. He loved his God, his family, and his country and gave his life for her in Quezon City, Philippines on 21 April 1989. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery Section 48 lot 2165-A.

Syria on the Eve of Destruction: America, Russia, China and WWIII- Part Two

logoIn the years between WWI and WWII, the world was in tumult. Wars, insurgencies, and insurrections did not end after the Great War, but actually intensified, however on a much smaller scale than WWI. It is important to note that WWII was basically a continuation of WWI with some fundamental differences and shifts in Alliances. It was as if WWI had simply been put on pause because of the sheer amount of casualties and money spent,  and because everyone was tired of war. There were still scores to settle and old hatreds burning. In part two of this four part examination of the imminent war with Syria and possibly the World, we will briefly go over the years between WWI and WWII, WWII very briefly, and the beginning of the Cold War, and all the wars by proxy afterward, and how that has contributed and led up to the breaking point that we are at now.

THE TIME BETWEEN WWI AND WWII: 21 YEARS- 1918 to 1939

Early on, there was a strong push by communists inside Germany, too. Red Socialism was sweeping Europe, particularly Eastern Europe. The “Spartacist” communist revolt was attempted in Berlin in January, 1919. It was quickly squashed by German forces, but a new type of radicalism was starting to grow among Germany’s youth and angry veterans of the first World War. But it would be a time before the Nazis were formed officially.

The German National Assembly met at Weimar in 1919. A couple of months later, the Treaty of Versailles is submitted to the German delegation by the Allies. Something to note: Hitler had always felt that the armistice was severe in the conditions that the treaty imposed on Germany, saying that it was far more brutal than what Germany had imposed on the Soviet Union after it withdrew from WWI. Regardless, the German authorities ended up signing the treaty nonetheless, but Hitler later used this to his advantage as one of his main arguments and rallying cries for hostilities to begin in what ultimately became WWII.

On the Central Powers side of things (Germany, Austria-Hungary), Germany’s national pride, stature, territory, and pocketbook took a crushing blow, suffering staggering loses in all aspects of its existence, while Austria loss massive amounts of territory, and Hungary became independent.

https://i0.wp.com/i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a605/Dano7810/map-of-europe-1914-ottoman-empire-i7_zpse4f53a56.pngOn the Allies side of things went the spoils of war, but not everyone was happy. America, Britain, and France got the lions share, while Japan and Italy walked away feeling cheated, having seem very little of the spoils. It is important to point out that it took the Allies six months to agree with one another what their treaty demands were on the Central Powers. Much of it was because they could not easily agree on who got what from the victory of the Great War. When they finally decided, Britain, America, and France made an unofficial alliance inside the Allies, and backed each other in agreement, forcing Italy and Japan to accept much less than the other three. This was not forgotten by Italy and Japan and they felt used. Russia was excluded because of the fall of the Russian Empire, the murder of the Tsars, and the forming of the Soviet Union by the Bolshevik Communists, which withdrew from the war and signed a treaty with Germany. Serbia, which seemed small in comparison to all that was going on then, became Yugoslavia. Continue reading

Syria on the Eve of Destruction: America, Russia, China and WWIII- Part One

logoThe stage is set, the pieces are in place, all somebody has to do is pull the trigger. The question is who will be the first to jump, and who will be the first to blink? If no one blinks, and I don’t think they will, the world is on a collision course with World War III. As usual, it is the same “Big 3” at the forefront of this rapidly developing emergency; America, Russia, and China. Unfortunately, it looks like America, under the incompetent leadership of Barack Obama, may be the first to make a move in this crisis, with the situation in Syria being the catalyst. However, this is not all of America’s responsibility, or fault, so we are going to take an in-depth, but as concise is as possible look back in history, all the way to the present, as well as at the prophetic Scriptures of the Holy Bible and the predictions of Nostradamus.

America, Russia, and China have been aligned to bump heads for a long time. This is nothing new. But, we are going to look at the reasons why we are here, why we need to take this very seriously, and to remember one very important thing: WE ARE ALL AMERICANS. Soon, it will not matter if you are a Liberal or a Conservative, Democrat or Republican, or a Believer or a Non-Believer. We are very possibly on the brink of the fight of our lives and generation. In order to survive, we are going to have to do what we always do, and band together to fight a common enemy. We also have to remember, that regardless of what the foolish Obama Administration drags us into, that Obama will not be the POTUS in a little over two years. Even if we are in the middle of WWIII, he will not be allowed to be re-elected, even under emergency powers. We will have to clean up the mess he has made, and right or wrong, fight our way out through to the other side and save our country. Let’s take a look at why this is happening.

WORLD WAR I-

http://0.tqn.com/d/history1900s/1/0/S/3/wwi18.gifAs for the political aspects of this situation, I am only going to reach as far back as WWI and the turn of the 20th century to show how we have come to be wrapped up in this conflict (s) in the present day. Remember, Syria is just the tipping point, not truly the cause. Observe.

Through WWI and WWII, you will see an interesting pattern emerge. I am going to try to keep this from being purely a history lesson, but in order to understand, you have to know the general and full history around the two great wars. Often, the only focus you will hear or see on WWI and WWII is the aggression of Germany, the heroism of America and the Allies, and the Holocaust that the Jews suffered. While these are all important components of the two World Wars and not to be disregarded, they are only parts of it. The circumstances and world-shaping that occurred from both of these wars has much more to them. I will touch on them here. I want you to keep in mind, also, that every war, every single one of them after WWII, has been nothing but proxy wars between America, Russia, and China. Remember this, too: The Cold War never ended, we just re-named it after political and geographical shifts. The players are still the same, only the name has changed. You will hear many familiar names and nations in this article that we have heard about in history for the last 100 years. There is more than ideology at work here. There is also money, old agreements, politics, and spiritual warfare at play. Whether those that wield the power of the sword, purse, or pen realize it, this is a much more epic and divine struggle than they, or even you and I understand. Continue reading

Heaven

I wrote this in 2005 while I was on my second world tour.

If I were to die and stand outside those beautiful gates,
I would look up to St. Peter, thinking of my fate.
Standing there while he looked me up and down,
I would tell him this with not even a frown:

“My name is Jason Vandeberg, and I am doing very well,
And I say this, sir, because I am finally out of hell.
No longer will I ever have to hurt or cry,
Nor will I have to hear another lie.
I lived my life to my best ability,
Learning to take every opportunity.
But I stand here now, sir, and I ponder one thing;
Am I pure enough to hear your angels sing?”

Jason Vandeberg